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Chicago

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Chicago

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memories of a warm summer

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the fifth floor of my office has no windows

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the fifth floor of my office has no windows

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Fancy tip:

There is no real ‘right’ focal length to simulate the way we see, however a combination of focal length, print size and distance the print is viewed is a factor to consider-

Take the number of you focal length shot on 35mm/full frame (or calculate crop factor to get equivalent focal length), and that is the distance in millimeters to view away from the original 24x36mm shot.

Blow this number up with the photo size, so if you shoot a shot with a 50mm lens (on a full frame camera), and blow it up to 24x36”, you will have the most believable perspective standing from 50” away, creating an almost surreal optical illusion of being within the scene.

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a charitable donation of shoes for those who need, sitting on a stone bench in the center of Chicago

#69

a charitable donation of shoes for those who need, sitting on a stone bench in the center of Chicago

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ran into a friend at random here

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ran into a friend at random here

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Chicago

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Chicago

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Chicago

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Chicago

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Found this upcoming web and mobile portfolio/digital business card idea, “Iconify”. Really simple, yet extremely powerful idea. It’s going into beta, so sign up for the chance to get an early run of this
the power of having a quick and accessible portfolio (that you can even install to your phone/tablet computer as a stand-alone app for offline display) is infinitely valuable when you may run into potential clients out and about. Check http://iconify.co/luke/ for a peek at how simple and to-the-point it is.

Found this upcoming web and mobile portfolio/digital business card idea, “Iconify”. Really simple, yet extremely powerful idea. It’s going into beta, so sign up for the chance to get an early run of this

the power of having a quick and accessible portfolio (that you can even install to your phone/tablet computer as a stand-alone app for offline display) is infinitely valuable when you may run into potential clients out and about. Check http://iconify.co/luke/ for a peek at how simple and to-the-point it is.

Happy 4th of July!

I’d like to share a (kind of) simple tutorial on how to shoot your own creative fireworks photos! All of these shots are exactly as they came off the camera, 100% (except some cropping). Provided you have an SLR and a lens you can focus manually (wide aperture helps), you can be taking these shots within seconds of the show starting

(If you know all of this technobabble already, just skim through, I’m making sure I explain this well enough for anyone to jump right in.)

  • set your camera to Manual (M on the mode dial).
  • Turn your shutter speed down, so far that it passes the seconds (marked similar to inches, like 10”) until it turns to “bulb”. I’ll explain why when we shoot.
  • make sure your lens’s aperture (f/#) is open either at or around the smallest number. This number varies depending on your lens- I shot these all with a 35mm f/1.8 at f/3.5, which is easily accomplished with the lenses that come with your camera, usually like an 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6. 

(Nikon cameras are really backwards compatible, lenses as far back as the 70’s will fit! see if your relatives have an old film camera with some nice lenses hiding in the basement.)

Alright, so now we’re at the event! Line up your shot by setting your camera on a tripod and looking right where the fireworks will be popping. If you don’t have a tripod, try to brace yourself against something so the camera doesn’t move too much.

all you really need to do at this point is focus on focusing.

First, turn off autofocus on your camera. It’s most likely a switch that says “AF/M” on the side of the lens itself, switch to M. this releases the focusing motor and you can quickly rotate the focusing ring back and forth. Figure out (by twisting your focus ring) which direction focuses in the distance, and which one is close.

Twist your focus to the distance and hold it there, waiting with your finger on the trigger for fireworks. Anything that happens when you’re focused properly to the fireworks will be sharp lines and points of light.

As soon as you see the rocket start flying, press and hold your shutter button. Because we’re in bulb mode, it will keep taking in light until you let go, creating a long exposure.

At whatever point you like (probably just after the “boom”), begin to twist your focus towards the ‘near’ end until everything goes blurry. When the firework is done and gone, let go of the shutter. (it might take a few seconds for your camera to process the file and show it on the screen). When you focus away from the fireworks, it changes the size of the points of light and creates those giant glowing orbs, drawing thick curved lines across the sky.

Give it a few tries, and you’ll get timing down to a science, and eventually start experimenting with different methods of focusing back and forth.

Go out and have some fun, do this with a friend twirling sparklers and impress everybody with photos that could make the 60’s jealous

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